Healthcare

Refugee Oral Health Promotion and Care

FDI survey says refugees have limited access to regular dental check-ups and screenings

09 September 2019

Oral health conditions among refugees should be addressed in the same way as other health concerns. FDI World Dental Federation surveyed its member National Dental Associations to measure the burden of oral disease among refugees in each member country.

Refugee Oral Health Promotion and Care

Promoting access to oral care on World Refugee Day to support universal health coverage

20 June 2019

FDI stands in solidarity with refugees and highlights the importance of ensuring their access to a reliable and complete level of oral care.

Australia's Oral Health Tracker

Australia's Oral Health Tracker redefines their view of oral health

01 May 2018

National oral health report card reveals that more than 90% of Australian adults have experienced decay in their permanent teeth.

child and mother brushing teeth

Parents delay child's first visit to the dentist due to lack of guidance from healthcare providers

06 March 2018

US poll shows that children first visit the dentist much later than recommended; FDI responds with oral care tips for parents and children.

Dental inequalities in London, UK (2012)

Barriers to oral health create regional divide among England’s rich and poor

07 December 2017

A recent report reveals an existing a divide in good oral health between northern and southern England, as well as rich and poor

©American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA)

Dentists can help provide oral healthcare for displaced persons from their own communities

25 October 2017

While there is much work still needed to strengthen health systems so they can meet the growing needs of displaced and host populations, dentists can play their part from their own communities by helping disseminate information on access to oral healthcare.

Dentist standing in her practice

Statistics report reveals oral health crisis in Ireland due to cuts in state funding

02 August 2017

New data shows that the number of dental treatments funded by the national healthcare system has fallen by over 16% between 2013–2016.